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Plant ware yarn produced by the flax industry

Plant ware yarn produced by the flax industry

Technically, linen is a vegetable. Linen fabric is made from the cellulose fibers that grow inside of the stalks of the flax plant, or Linum usitatissimum, one of the oldest cultivated plants in human history. Flax is an annual plant, which means it only lives for one growing season. From seed-planting, it is ready to be harvested in about a hundred days. Unless the weather is particularly warm and dry, flax requires little watering or attention during this time.

VIDEO ON THE TOPIC: The CHICO FLAX Project: Flax to Linen

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Linen Guide: History, Production & Processing

Focusing on the flax of life. The native plant has the potential to support several diverse ventures. Flax, or harakeke, was once the basis of a thriving industry. With the right leadership, a decade of taxpayer-funded research into possible uses of harakeke-based products could be turned into commercial success.

A recent Rotorua forum on the native plant found plenty of interest in its multiple potential uses, including three parties with plans for ventures in natural health, skincare and textiles. But in the absence of industrial partners or a collective push to establish a large-scale, commercially viable industry, funding has been pulled for collaborative research undertaken by AgResearch, the Biopolymer Network and Scion. The industry was once thriving. In the first half of last century, Maori relied on harakeke for making clothing, rope and medicine.

More recently, interest in its uses has been renewed thanks to flax being planted in small blocks near waterways by iwi, farmers and local councils. A report by the Sustainable Farming Fund investigated increasing on-farm planting of harakeke to make the raw material available for new industries.

It ticks a lot of boxes, because it can be sustainably harvested, is environmentally friendly, has cultural resonance and could provide employment in rural areas. Although research into developing new applications is already under way by crown research organisations, the report deemed it too soon to recommend large-scale planting without there being a clear market for an increased supply.

The taxpayer-funded research resulted in the development of a composite product made from harakeke fibres that could replace fibreglass in a number of applications, including boat cabinetry, automotive parts, kitchen and bathroom ware, wall coverings and surfboards. However, in a chicken-and-egg situation, companies are reluctant to commit to what are likely to be relatively small-scale niche uses, especially when there are only ad hoc plantings and no infrastructure for extracting harakeke fibre in large quantities.

Biopolymer Network chief executive Sarah Heine said she would be happy for someone else to pick up the research and put it to commercial use.

Auckland-based skincare company Snowberry, for example, makes products that combine modern skin-renewal science and natural plant-based extracts. It plans to start exporting native plant extracts, including seed oil and gel from harakeke. The opportunity to develop the industry and take a collaborative approach is definitely there. In the King Country, Maori trust Maraeroa C established a plantation in and uses it as a tourist attraction. Trust chief executive Daniel Benefield says that if a viable business opportunity presents itself in future for harvesting the leaf for fibre muka , the trust will consider it.

Te Papa conservator Rangi Te Kanawa has, after 15 years of trying, produced a prototype machine to extract muka, instead of traditional hand extraction methods. So far, machines produce a rougher, industrial version of the fibre than muka, which forms the base of most Maori cloaks.

Te Kanawa, who comes from a long line of weavers, says muka from his wooden machine can be spun into yarn. The next stage is producing fibre in greater quantities to prove it could work at scale, and developing a business case that would attract a commercial partner to pursue the opportunity. The project aims to completely rid the country of possums, stoats and rats.

In a trial, 40ha at Putanui Point in Pelorus Sound were cleared in three months and have been kept pest-free for the past 18 months. After clearing a finger of land, Zip sets up a fenceless barrier that can deter, trap and detect invading pests, notifying remote conservationists rather than needing a patrolling labour force.

Or it might sample stream water where it hits the coast to look at the DNA to see if there is a rat in the catchment. Investment See more. Why we're at a tipping point for term deposits. Investing ethically is good for your wealth. The difference between active and passive investing. How to make your retirement savings last and your investments go further.

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Flax is the wealth of Belarus

Linen is laborious to manufacture, but the fiber is very strong, absorbent, and dries faster than cotton. Garments made of linen are valued for their exceptional coolness and freshness in hot and humid weather. This word history has given rise to a number of other terms in English, most notably line , from the use of a linen flax thread to determine a straight line. The collective term " linens " is still often used generically to describe a class of woven or knitted bed, bath, table and kitchen textiles traditionally made of flax-based linen but today made from a variety of fibers.

The family business is currently run by the fourth generation of Vannestes : Alex Vanneste. We are modifying shortening and refining the long-staple flax and tow into a fiber with the characteristics of cotton, a artificial or synthetic fiber that is suitable to spin on the short staple ring or rotor spinning system.

Climatic conditions in Belarus are ideal for growing flax and specialists call it the cleanest and most wonderful product. It thrives regardless of rainfall and can grow without much fertiliser. Importantly, no part of the plant is wasted. Since ancient times, linen clothes have been popular; the trend continues, with linen clothes being hygienic and comfortable.

How Linen is Made

Sheep farming has been part of a traditional way of life for thousands of years in Cumbria as much as the rest of the country. The hand spindle and spinning wheel with the hand loom were a common sight in the home where they were used to spin the wool from a fleece and weave the yarn produced into cloth. In the uplands of the Lake District, land suitable for arable agriculture was sparse, and farmers were reliant on the rearing of stock. The Cumbrian sheep breed the Herdwick is reputed to have been introduced by Scandinavian settlers in the tenth or eleventh century, and was renowned for its coarse but hard-wearing wool. Commercial sheep rearing After the Norman Conquest, wealthy landowners followed a path to salvation by donating much of their estates to establish and maintain monasteries and their monks. Whole areas of Cumbria were apportioned to one religious house or another who generated much of their income by keeping large flocks on their lands and making sure that the fleeces were of good quality in order to attract foreign buyers. For example, in AD, Furness Abbey had 14 granges in Furness, Millom, Dunnerdale, Eskdale and Borrowdale — some to tenanted farms with 60, sheep in total. Hundreds of fleeces would be packed into sacks for export to the Continent — Furness was sending 30 sacks to Italy each year of good quality wool. A cottage industry Monastery land was redistributed to large landowners after the Dissolution of the Monasteries by the mids, and wool now went for sale in local market towns rather than being exported. Changes in the national tax regime to encourage production of cloth here rather than abroad supported the growth of the domestic system of cloth manufacture

Focusing on the flax of life

This humble plant is amazingly versatile, whether it's used in food, drying oil for oil paintings or in textiles, otherwise known as "linen". You might have noticed that linen is experiencing something of a renaissance at the moment and it's no wonder. Clothing made from this fibre has incredible drape, breathability and is cool to wear in the summer heat. Not only that: flax doesn't require pesticides to grow, making it one of the most eco-friendly fibres you can use. Did you know that it is times stronger and smoother than cotton too?

Linen has been known in civilized societies for thousands of years.

This two-volume encyclopedia, which covers all aspects of the decorative arts from ancient times to the present day and throughout Western and non-Western cultures, is the first in a series of print Account Options Anmelden. Meine Mediathek Hilfe Erweiterte Buchsuche. Oxford University Press Amazon.

How is Linen Yarn Made?

We see its ecological consciousness throughout the industry. Mechanical activities are a part of each operation in its transformation — scutching, combing, spinning, weaving. Counting all stages of production, the European linen industry is made up of 10, companies in 14 countries of the EU : a network of interactive professionnals — growers, scutchers, spinners, weavers, knitters, finishers, traders. Linen helps maintain an economic and social fabric in rural zones.

Focusing on the flax of life. The native plant has the potential to support several diverse ventures. Flax, or harakeke, was once the basis of a thriving industry. With the right leadership, a decade of taxpayer-funded research into possible uses of harakeke-based products could be turned into commercial success. A recent Rotorua forum on the native plant found plenty of interest in its multiple potential uses, including three parties with plans for ventures in natural health, skincare and textiles.

About Flax

Account Options Sign in. My library Help Advanced Book Search. Get print book. The International Exhibition of , Volume 4. Cambridge University Press , Anonymous. Cambridge University Press , M04 17 - pages.

Linen yarn is spun from the long fibers found just behind the bark in the multi-layer stem of the flax plant (Linum usitatissimum). The cellulose fiber from the stem is spinnable and is used in the production of linen thread, cordage, and twine.

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more Got it! In the operatives in the jute and hemp industry numbered 39,, and in they were including workers in canvas, sacking, sailcloth, rope, twine, mats, cocoa fibre 46, Other important manufactures are iron and steel, slaughtering and meat-packing products, boots and shoes, cigars, furniture, men's clothing, hosiery and knit goods, jute and jute goods, linen-thread, malt liquors, brick, cement, barbed wire, wire nails and planing-mill products.

Account Options Anmelden. Meine Mediathek Hilfe Erweiterte Buchsuche. Cambridge University Press Amazon. Cambridge University Press , Anonymous.

Linen yarn is spun from the long fibers found just behind the bark in the multi-layer stem of the flax plant Linum usitatissimum. In order to retrieve the fibers from the plant, the woody stem and the inner pith called pectin , which holds the fibers together in a clump, must be rotted away. The cellulose fiber from the stem is spinnable and is used in the production of linen thread, cordage, and twine.

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Я постараюсь.  - Вопрос национальной безопасности… - Если вам не повезет, - сказала Росио, бросив взгляд на пухлый конверт, выпирающий в кармане Беккера, - пожалуйста, заходите. Мой дружок скоро заснет как убитый. Постучите тихонько. Я найду свободную комнату и покажу вам Испанию с такой стороны, что вам будет что вспомнить, - И она сладко причмокнула губами.

Канадский француз. - Пожалуйста, уделите мне одну минуту. Беккер отлично говорил по-французски, тем не менее обратился к этому человеку на языке, который тот, как он надеялся, должен был знать хуже. Убедить абсолютно незнакомого человека отдать вам золотое кольцо скорее всего будет весьма непросто, поэтому Беккер хотел заручиться хотя бы одним преимуществом. Пока старик собирался с мыслями, Беккер не произнес ни слова.

Тот огляделся вокруг, указательным пальцем разгладил усы и наконец заговорил: - Что вам нужно? - Он произносил английские слова немного в нос.

Чутье мне подсказывает.  - Второе, что никогда не ставилось под сомнение, - это чутье Мидж.  - Идем, - сказала она, вставая.

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  1. Arashirg

    True idea