On The Radar – July Edition

The SFWP Awards Program is “looking for fiction and creative nonfiction of any length, genre, and subject matter.” Judge: Benjamin Percy. Submission deadline: July 22

Can Serrat International Art Residency opens the Residency Call for Writers. This Open Call is meant to support literary production and to offer a working and living space for writers. We will invite 1 writer for a full grant in addition to inviting 49 writers for a partial aid support stipend.” Application deadline: August 1st.

Yaddo is a retreat for artists located on a 400-acre estate in Saratoga Springs, New York. Its mission is to nurture the creative process by providing an opportunity for artists to work without interruption in a supportive environment.” Application deadline: August 1st.

Litro Magazine is accepting poetry, fiction, and essay about the “experience of boundaries, real and imagined, in a bold array of poetry, fiction, and essay” for their Latin America-themed issue. Submission deadline: August 23

American Short Fiction has published, and continues to seek, short fiction by some of the finest writers working in contemporary literature, whether they are established or new or lesser-known authors.” Submissions year-round

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On the Radar – May Edition

Boulevard strives to publish only the finest in fiction, poetry, and non-fiction.” Submission deadline May 1

Prairie Schooner publishes short stories, poems, imaginative essays of general interest, and reviews of current books of poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction.” Submission deadline May 1

Jack Jones Literary Arts is hosting its first annual writing retreat at SMU-in-Taos in Taos, New Mexico. This two-week retreat will be held October 12- 26, 2017, and is open exclusively to women of color.” Application deadline: May 1

The Emerging Voices Fellowship is a literary mentorship that aims to provide new writers who are isolated from the literary establishment with the tools, skills, and knowledge they need to launch a professional writing career.” Application period OPENS May 1. 

Poetic Duels: Sheyr Jangi
Poetic battles–called sheyr jangi in Afghanistan–have roots in the early medieval Asia. For this event, poets Majda Gama, Rami Karim, Aurora Masum-Javed, Sham-e-Ali Nayeem, and Purvi Shah will pay homage to this tradition. May 6 at 7:30 pm

“This summer, One Story will offer our annual writing conference for emerging writers, hosted in our home, the historic Old American Can Factory in Brooklyn.” Applications due May 10

The Emerging [Ploughshares] Writer’s Contest is open to writers of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry who have yet to publish or self-publish a book. The winner in each genre will be awarded $2,000.” Deadline May 15

“Published quarterly, the Gettysburg Review considers unsolicited submissions of poetry, fiction, and essays, from September 1 through May 31 (postmark dates).”

AGNI publishes poetry, short fiction, and essays.” Submission deadline May 31

Baltimore Review is accepting new submissions from through May 31.

New England Review is accepting new submissions from through May 31.

Apply for the July 2017 New Orleans Writers’ Residency. Application deadline: June 1

The [Headlands] Artist in Residence (AIR) program awards fully sponsored residencies to approximately 45 local, national, and international artists each year. Residencies of four to ten weeks include studio space, chef-prepared meals, comfortable housing, and travel and living stipends. Application deadline: June 2

The Baltic Writing Residency is extremely excited to announce the establishment of the Stormé DeLarverie writing residency, specifically aimed at under-represented writers.” Application deadline: June 15

The Marianne Russo Award, the Scotti Merrill Memorial Award, and the Cecelia Joyce Johnson Award recognize and support writers who possess exceptional talent and demonstrate potential for lasting literary careers.” Application deadline: June 30

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On the Radar – February Edition

“The Bread Loaf Conferences offer an array of programs that are part of a tradition that started in 1926 with the first Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference.” They offer financial aid, a fellowship, and a few scholarships to make it more feasible for writers that aren’t financially rolling in it to attend. Deadline: February 15

The Anderson Center provides retreats of two to four weeks duration from May through October each year to enable artists, writers, and scholars of exceptional promise and demonstrated accomplishment to create, advance, or complete works-in-progress.” New York City and Minnesota artists: apply for the month of August. It is Jerome Foundation funded. I was a resident in August of 2016 and it was a great space where I met some really interesting fellow artists and did a dizzying amount of revision on a story in my collection. Deadline: February 15

The Dora Maar Summer/Fall Fellowship offers:
• One to three months in residence at the Dora Maar House.
• A private bedroom and bath, and a study or studio in which to work.
• Round-trip travel expenses to Dora Maar House.
• A grant based upon the length of stay at Dora Maar House. Deadline: February 15

Apply to the 2017 NYC Emerging Writers Program. Nine writers will receive a one-year fellowship during and:
“• A grant of $5,000
• The option to engage in a mentorship with a selected freelance editor
• The opportunity to meet with agents who represent new writers
• A Center for Fiction membership that includes borrowing privileges for our collection of new fiction and fiction-related titles
• Free admission to all Center events for one year, including tickets to our First Novel Fete and benefit dinner as space allows
• 30% discount on tuition at select writing workshops at the Center
• Two public readings as part of our annual program of events and inclusion in an anthology distributed to industry professionals
• A professional headshot with a photographer for personal publicity use” Deadline: February 15

Epiphany Magazine‘s annual Spring writing contest has some bad-ass judges. Deadline: February 20

Tax Preparation for Artists. “Are you ready for April 15? This in-person workshop will not only help you get prepared for the upcoming tax deadline, but will also give you the tips and tools you need to keep your receipts, expenses, and business records organized throughout the year.” February 22

The BAU at Camargo Arts Residency “supports the development of work in the Visual Arts (including photography, video and new media), Creative Writing, Dramatic Writing, Performance and Musical Composition.” Deadline: February 28

The Restless Books Prize for Immigrant New Writing awards $10,000 and publication “for an outstanding debut work by a first-generation American author.” They alternate between fiction and non-fiction every year. This year it’s non-fiction. Deadline: February 28

“AWP sponsors the Award Series, an annual competition for the publication of excellent new book-length works.” Deadline: February 28

The Glimmer Train Short Story Award for New Writers is “open only to writers whose fiction has not appeared, nor is scheduled to appear, in a print publication with a circulation over 5,000. (Entries must not have appeared in print, but previous online publication is fine.) Most entries run from 1,000 to 5,000 words, but any lengths up to 12,000 are welcome.” Deadline: February 28

Ninth Letter is published semi-annually at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. We are interested in prose and poetry that experiment with form, narrative, and nontraditional subject matter, as well as more traditional literary work.: Deadline: February 28

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On the Radar – December Edition

Yaddo is a retreat for artists located on a 400-acre estate in Saratoga Springs, New York. Its mission is to nurture the creative process by providing an opportunity for artists to work without interruption in a supportive environment.” Application deadline: January 1

The Steinbeck Fellows Program of San José State University (SJSU), which was endowed through the generosity of Martha Heasley Cox, offers emerging writers of any age and background the opportunity to pursue a significant writing project while in residence at SJSU.” Application deadline: January 2

Glimmer Train is “looking for stories about families of all configurations” for its November/December Family Matters contest. Submission Deadline: January 2

“For the past 31 years, NYFA has awarded fellowships of $7,000 to individual originating artists living in New York State and/or Indian Nations located in New York State. 2017 NYSCA/NYFA ARTIST FELLOWSHIP CATEGORIES: Crafts/Sculpture, Printmaking/Drawing/Book Arts, Nonfiction Literature, Poetry, Digital/Electronic Arts.” Application deadline: January 25

“Each January since 2003, The Iowa Review has invited submissions to The Iowa Review Awards, a writing contest in poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. Winners receive $1,500; first runners-up receive $750. Winners and runners-up are published in each December issue.” Submit between January 1 – 31 

“Submissions are now open for the DISQUIET Prize for writing in any genre. Three winners will be published in Guernica (fiction), NinthLetter.com (non-fiction) or The Common (poetry). One grand prize winner will receive a full scholarship, accommodations, and travel stipend to attend the seventh annual DISQUIET International Literary Program in Lisbon taking place June 25- July 7, 2017.” Submission deadline: January 31

2017 Kenyon Review Short Fiction Contest. “The contest is open to all writers who have not yet published a book of fiction. Submissions must be 1,200 words or fewer.” Submit between January 1 -31

“In Fall 2017, the Bellevue Literary Review will publish a special theme issue, seeking high-caliber poetry, fiction, and nonfiction that explore the concept of family—the primary latticework and laboratory of human nature.” Submission deadline: January 31

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On the Radar – October Edition

NFA Grants for Latino Artists and Ensembles support the work of individual artists and ensembles in all disciplines. Open to Latino artists and ensembles in the United States.The NFA offers three grant categories for artists and ensembles: Project Grant, Master Artist Grant and the San Antonio Artist Project Grant. The San Antonio Artist Grant category is supported by the City of San Antonio Department for Culture and Creative Development and is only open to residents of San Antonio, Texas.” Deadline: October 13

TSR publishes work from established authors and newcomers, but only the best of the best.” Deadline: October 15

“The Sixth Annual StoryQuarterly Fiction Prize. The winner will receive $1000, and the winner, first runner-up and second runner-up will be published in StoryQuarterly 50.” Judge is Alexander Chee (who is warm and thoughtful and omg, have you read Queen of the Night?) Deadline: October 15

“Fellowships are six weeks in length and occur year-round. The Lighthouse Works provides fellows with housing, food, studio space, a $250 travel allowance and a stipend of $1,500 to defray the costs of shipping materials, the purchase of art supplies, and other expenses incurred in making artwork in a remote location; our belief is that no artist should have to spend money to accept the opportunity of a fellowship.” Deadline: October 15

I’m cofacilitating Get the Yes: Crafting Your Best Application for Residencies, Fellowships, Grants and Workshops along with Grace Jahng Lee at Bindercon. Whether you’re applying for a writing residency, fellowship, grant, scholarship, or workshop, the process can be anxiety-provoking. How do you even find out about these opportunities? How do you decide which to apply to? What does an artist statement include? Who will write your recommendation letters if you lack literary networks? What do you include in a writer’s CV if you have no/few publications? How do you select your best writing sample? What are strategies for dealing with multiple rejections? For residencies, additional nail-biting may emerge: How do you take time off from work and family obligations to disappear into the woods to write for weeks? How will you finance your residency if you still have rent/bills to pay while away? BinderCon takes place on October 29-30

Indiana Review. “General submissions & submissions to our Special Folio: Metallic Grit are now open until October 31st.

The London Magazine‘s Short Story Competition. The story that wins first-place will be published in a future issue of The London Magazine.” Deadline: October 31

“Applications will open on October 1 for A Public Space’s 2017 Emerging Writer Fellowships. Under this project, three emerging writers will be selected for six-month fellowships, which will include: mentorship from an established author who has previously contributed to A Public Space; publication in the magazine; contributor’s payment of $1,000; workspace in our Brooklyn offices (optional).” Deadline: November 1

 “Recommended Reading is Accepting Previously Published Stories. This fall, our weekly fiction magazine has two separate categories for submissions: previously published and original stories. For the two weeks in November, we’re asking writers to submit only stories that have been previously published elsewhere to be considered for a second life in Recommended Reading.” Deadline: November 15

“Celebrated novelist Dana Spiotta (Stone Arabia, Eat the Document) returns to the Center to talk about her latest book, the critically acclaimed Innocents and Others. Spiotta will be joined in conversation by the award-winning master of American fiction, George Saunders (Tenth of December). Saunder’s debut novel, Lincoln in the Bardo, will be published in February 2017.”
In Conversation: Dana Spiotta and George Saunders
Tuesday November 15, 2016
07:00 pm

“Every fall Pleiades Press holds a short prose contest (for fiction and nonfiction). We’re interested in reading collections short stories, flash fiction, essays, lyric essays, and any other forms of short prose you can think of. The winning manuscript will be  awarded $2000 and published by Pleiades Press.” Deadline: November 15

Witness seeks original fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and photography that is innovative in its approach, broad-ranging in its concerns, and that dazzles us with its unique perspective.” Deadline: November 15

The Camargo Core Program consists of fellowship residencies of six to eleven weeks.” Deadline: November 24

The Sherwood Anderson Fiction Prize awards $1,000 and publication in Mid-American Review. Judge is Charles Yu. Deadline: November 30

The 31st Annual Tennessee Williams/New Orleans Literary Festival is holding a fiction contest that will award $1,500, domestic airfare (up to $500) and French Quarter accommodations to attend the Festival in New Orleans, VIP All-Access Festival pass for the next Festival ($500 value), a public reading at a literary panel at the next Festival and publication in Louisiana Literature. Judge is Dorothy Allison. Deadline: November 30

Fish Publishing is holding a short story contest. The top ten stories will be published in the 2017 Fish Anthology. First prize is  €3,000 plus a 5 day Short Story Workshop at the West Cork Literary Festival. Deadline: November 30

2016 Arcadia Press Chapbook Prize. “A prize of $1,000 and twenty-five author copies is given annually for a chapbook of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction.” Deadline: November 30

The Hudson Review publishes fiction, poetry, essays, book reviews; criticism of literature, art, theatre, dance, film, and music; and articles on contemporary cultural developments.” Deadline: November 30

Zyzzva. Deadline: November 30

“Published quarterly by The University of Georgia since 1947, The Georgia Review features an eclectic blend of essays, fiction, poetry, visual art, and book reviews.” Reading period re-opened August 16

American Short Fiction has published, and continues to seek, short fiction by some of the finest writers working in contemporary literature, whether they are established or new or lesser-known authors. In addition to its triannual print magazine, American Short Fiction also publishes stories (under 2000 words) online.” Year-round submissions
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On the Radar – September Edition

I have abandoned my usual sense of time this month. These are deadlines in October, but also a list of who is starting to read again in the fall. Here goes:

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One Story is seeking literary fiction. Because of our format, we can only accept stories between 3,000 and 8,000 words.” Submission period begins: September 1

“Published quarterly, the Gettysburg Review considers unsolicited submissions of poetry, fiction, and essays, from September 1 through May 31 (postmark dates).” Submission period begins: September 1

New England Review is looking for “fiction, poetry, nonfiction, drama, translation, creative writing for the web site (NER Digital), cover art, and art for our website.” Submission period begins: September 1

“Since 1977 Willow Springs has published the finest in contemporary fiction, nonfiction, and poetry, as well as interviews with notable authors including Marilynne Robinson, Stuart Dybek, Aimee Bender, Robert Wrigley, Joyce Carol Oates, Yusef Komunyakaa, and Kim Addonizio, to name a few.” Submission period begins: September 1

Wallace Stegner Fellowship. “Unique among writing programs, Stanford offers ten two-year fellowships each year, five in fiction and five in poetry. All the fellows in each genre convene weekly in a 3-hour workshop with faculty. Fellows are regarded as working artists, intent upon practicing and perfecting their craft. The only requirements are workshop attendance and writing. The program offers no degree.” Application period opens: September 1

The Travel and Study Grant Program awards grants to emerging artists who create new work, rotating the eligible disciplines in alternating years. Funds support periods of travel for the purpose of study, exploration, and growth…The eligible disciplines for 2017 are music; theater; and visual arts. Applicants must be “generative” artists (e.g. composers or sound artists in music; playwrights, performance artists and directors of ensemble based theatre companies; and visual artists of all genres).” Guidelines for the 2017 Travel and Study Grant Program will be posted September 7

Fiction. “Staying under 5,000 words is encouraged, but we will read fiction manuscripts of any length.” Submission period begins: September 15

Kenyon Review. “We publish the best work we can find—this is the case for both KR and KROnline. The two are aesthetically distinct spaces.” Submission period begins: September 15

“The city’s largest free literary festival, the Brooklyn Book Festival is one of the country’s premier international book festivals, drawing tens of thousands each year to the global creative capital of Brooklyn, NYC. The 7-day festival launches with a week of city-wide Bookend Events, a Children’s Day celebrating childhood literature and finally Festival Day — a day-long literary extravaganza with more than 100 panel discussions and reading on 12-stages and a vibrant outdoor Literary Marketplace.” September 18 (with loads of events that whole week off-site)

26th Annual Jeffrey E. Smith Editors’ Prize awards $5,000 Fiction, $5,000 Nonfiction and $5,000 Poetry. “Winners receive publication, invitation to a reception and reading in their honor and a cash prize.” Deadline: October 1

Twentieth Annual Zoetrope: All-Story Fiction Contest. “The three prizewinners and seven honorable mentions will be considered for representation by William Morris Endeavor; ICM; the Wylie Agency; Regal Literary; Dunow, Carlson & Lerner Literary Agency; Markson Thoma Literary Agency; Inkwell Management; Sterling Lord Literistic; Aitken Alexander Associates; Barer Literary; the Gernert Company; and the Georges Borchardt Literary Agency.” Deadline: October 1

The Comadres and Compadres Writers Conference, provides Latino writers with access to published Latino authors as well as agents and editors who have a proven track record of publishing Latino books…The 5th Annual Comadres and Compadres Writers Conference, taking place at The New School in New York, will be a SPECIAL EDITION. This year the conference will offer writing master classes, only.” October 1

The Aura Estrada Short Story Contest. “The winning author will receive $1,500 and have his or her work published by Boston Review.” Deadline October 3

“Since its founding in 1992, Writers Omi at Ledig House has hosted hundreds of authors and translators, representing more than fifty countries. We welcome published writers and translators of every type of literature. International, cultural and creative exchange is a foundation of our mission, and a wide distribution of national background is an important part of our selection process. Guests may select a residency of one week to two months; about ten at a time gather to live and work in a rural setting overlooking the Catskill Mountains. Ledig House provides all meals, and each night a local chef prepares dinner. Daytime is reserved for writing and quiet activities, while evenings are more communal. A program of weekly visits bring guests from the New York publishing community.” Application deadline: October 20

Sexism in the Literary World. “In the literary world, as in broader society, gender inequality remains an ongoing problem, and the poor representation of women writers a contentious topic. Organizations such as VIDA highlight the imbalances in visibility between women and men in scores of online and print publications. Arguably, sexism and misogyny are central to this issue. This event brings together novelists Bonnie Nadzam and Porochista Khakpour, social change advocate and journalist Kavita Das, and Amy King of VIDA, to discuss sexism and harassment in the publishing industry and writing programs, and what can, and should, be done to improve the representation of women writers. The Center’s director Noreen Tomassi will moderate, and contribute her insight.”
October 25

Why I Leave “Pushcart Prize nominee” in my Bio

When a small journal nominated one of my stories in 2013, it was the first nod of anything besides publication. It felt good. It was a story I liked, one I still love, one a lot of people since have told me they loved. It’s the story I’ve tinkered on the least post-publication. One I felt I executed with every ounce of skill and heart I had, harmoniously, and to the max. The editor that nominated it treated it like a teacher would a student they really believed in.

One time, I was looking back on some childhood school photos with someone and they pointed out my penchant for colored socks. Like visible-under-the-hem, bright-ass socks. And it was a moment when you realize that something you did and thought little about or did and loved was incredibly dorky.

It’s like that in writing-as-career too. And I mean career in the blandest sense possible. You get your first piece accepted in some little journal and you’re ecstatic. Until something makes you aware of the hierarchy of journals. Then that little journal doesn’t seem worth mentioning anymore, even though it sure made you feel like a real fucking writer two seconds ago. The harder it is to get picked, the better it must be, right? If other people can have this too, it must be crap.

Somewhere between other writers’ snark (usually white, usually over-educated, and fond of hierarchies) making me aware that thousands of writers get nominated for Pushcarts, I came to the conclusion leaving it on my bio was incredibly dorky. Less than a month ago, I was at a writing conference/workshop where it was a joke in someone’s opening remarks. If you google Pushcart Prize, there are dozens of blog posts pointing out how much of a dork you are for believing your small accolade. I should’ve been embarrassed at leaving such a clear trail of newb-ness.

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A fruit vendor’s push cart, Cartagena, Colombia by Joe Ross

One day, the Pushcart nominee thing came up in conversation with a respected and lauded poet and teacher friend who keeps it on his bio along with “bigger” awards. “Everyone and their moms gets one of those,” was what I said. And in that way he has of putting your your shit in perspective with an economy of words (fucking poets!) he said, “My moms didn’t.”

What that did to me was two things. One, it snapped me out of a touch of the comemierdas I contracted from these writers. So because these writers who I deemed more knowledgeable about writing-as-career deemed it meh, I had to deem it meh too? Automatically? Without measuring for myself, against myself?

And Two, who was this “everyone” because he was right. Our moms were not getting Pushcart nominations. They were busy getting visa nominations (or not), work nominations, nominating what bills they could pay, and nominating what was for dinner. To put a finer point on it, as another teacher would later put it, “Herman Melville was not thinking about you when he was writing Moby Dick.” Perhaps thousands of American white writers have been nominated, but how many that look like me and come from where I come from? Your small potatoes can be someone’s whole meal.

That conversation, no longer than a minute or two, was a call to stop measuring myself against rulers not made for me. There’s no such thing as everyone or universal experience. And hey if your moms was getting Pushcart nominations and the like, that’s great, my daughter will be able to say that kind of thing, but I was wrong to hold you up as “everyone” when I knew different.

Now, this is not to say, we shouldn’t aim for larger, higher, more. This is also not to say that as you get more that some things won’t drop off to make room for other things, but dammit you be the one to decide what betterment means to you. You be the one to decide what is important on your bio and reflects your trajectory the best at that moment. I just submitted a piece to a prize and left it in. It’s followed by other things that say something about how I’ve been becoming a writer since that nomination, but it’s in there. And look, tomorrow, six months from now, years from now I could totally decide to drop it, but today it still has significance for me.

I loved those socks. My grandma bought them for me with retirement checks. She matched them to my scrunchies. And even though all my socks are black, white, and gray (like my soul!), I look back at the cheerful ankles of my youth with kindness and affection.

You like the socks? Wear the fucking socks.